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20121027
20121104
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Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)
george w. bush, who tried briefly to governor as a kind of bipartisan moderate, but then turned markedly conservative. so in those days you have the same kind of democratic rage against that republican president that you now have in reverse. it's very difficult to see where the middle ground would be for either of these candidates, and it won't be any easier if we have a narrow result, because that will mean the new president, whoever he is, doesn't have a terrificcally strong mandate from the public. won't be able to say, look, an enormous majority of the public wants to go my way. if this election is very narrow or even worse, contested, the president is going to have a very demanding job. >> when you speak to voters in ohio, everybody says they want compromise, they want to get things done. do they? >> no. by and large when you talk to american voters, and you've done this yourself, i know, yes, everybody wants compromise and everyone wants bipartisanship. but usually the definition of bipartisanship is the other side should come in my direction. so that's a hazard for any candidate,
press secretary under president george w. bush. hello to both of you. >> your setup there looks fantastic. democracy plaza looks great. >> i wish you were here to see it. they have been working so hard on this. i could go on an on. we have details to get to. people ice skating. it's just cool. but let's talk about a couple of different ideas here, karen, with you. two respected political analysts have widely divergent predictions for the election. nate silver gives the president an 84% chance of winning and says he'll get 305 electoral votes. flip side mitt romney will be winning with 315 electoral votes. does anyone know what's going to happen? >> no, of course not. this is why i love politics. and this is why i love the pollsters. they try to apply science and data that predict. we're talk about human beings. and human behavior is unpredictable. we can have a sense of what we think is going to happen. the numbers i've been looking at are some of the early vote numbers. for example if you look at some of of these battle ground states and the number of people who have already vo
is the same thing that actually was practiced in the george w. bush administration. president obama isn't using george w. bush's name, but the message is actually pretty crystal clear. and you're seeing these two competing closing arguments at the very end. >> with that being the argument from the president that, you know, especially before hurricane sandy it was when mitt romney unveiled this notion that he is the change candidate here, how has his campaign, or have they effectively fought back that what he is offering back at this late game, 3, 2, 1, what we is a at the bottom, he offering anything that proves he would in fact bring in change? >> well, he hasn't rebutted those criticisms of how his policies are different than george w. bush's. the one he has pointed out, and he did this at the debate is he would actually balance the budget, something that george w. bush didn't do. so that's where he says he would be different. but when you actually look at a lot of the advisers, a lot of the economic policies, they do seem the same. and he hasn't really rebutted that. but what he is a
when george bush did it, and the report went through statistics of many decades of data that would verify what anybody would know if they looked at it. >> jennifer: somebody called it the banana republic, that they were pressured to sit on the report. do you think there is some political shenanigans happening? the nonpartisan folks won't release the report? >> well, the way i heard it was that some of the republican congressional leadership rejected to the regression methodology. so i'm not sure about that. i think it probably was not what they considered the oppertune moment, i feel that's why they pull it down. >> jennifer: i'm shocked. i'm sure you are, too. gentlemen, thank you some for coming inside "the war room." this is the most important last data point before the election. up next, if president obama wins the electoral vote but loses the national vote, are we going to be celebrating tuesday the one time it's okay for you to miss my show is if that's the only time you can get to a polling place. make sure that voting is your highest priority on election day. besides, you c
phenomenon that has changed that. he one the state twice. in 2000 it went to george w. bush. kerrey., john care the president got a nine point victory in 2008. we really are tossups state. the polls go back and forth. it is difficult to determine who is going to win this state right now. host: is there early voting and how do the hampshire residents vote on election day? guest: there's not early voting, but there's absentee ballot. you have to sign a form saying you are not going to be available on voting day to come to the polls. traditionally, the polls are open from about 7:00 until 7:00. some locations are open until 8:00 p.m. on election day. we have one of the highest voter turnouts in the country. other statistical interesting facts are that we are one of the least taxed states in the nation. the least. we have no income tax, no sales tax. the democratic and republican candidates will pledge on that issue, saying they will not have an income tax or sales tax. our two gubernatorial candidates right now are both running on that issue. host: neil levesque, about the recount laws in the
absolutely care. barack obama said george w. bush signing statements and he made the executive branch too powerful, but it turns out he didn't have a problem with executive orders and signing statements, he had a problem with who was doing it. we and independents in florida want a president who will stay within the parameters of the legitimate authority of the presidency. president obama is not pressing independents in florida by running on bill clinton's record and blaming george w. bush. independents are saying, what about your record, mr. president. >> we'll talk a lot more about the undecided states of america not hour. be sure to stay with us for that. we'll talk about new hampshire, the four electoral votes there could really be the difference in this historically close race. >>> this is a story that has a lot of people. we have the latest on malala, the 15-year-old girl shot by the taliban. s everyday you see all the ways all of us at us bank are helping grow our economy. lending more so companies and communities can expand, grow stronger and get back to work. everyday you see all
or others is a very valuable story, especially very close to the election today. you remember george bush when he stood with a megaphone at 9/11, create ad tremendous amount of support in that story. that imagery is very, very powerful. it makes him authentic and is effective. david: talk about obama's picking on mitt romney particularly with the bain capital stuff. this buy, bain capital is bad organization and guy who started it is bad too. how did that story turn out? >> you know i think it is authentic from obama saying it from that standpoint. i don't think it is particularly effective. it does not move many people across the meter. one of the things the story has to shine through. if the storyteller isn't authentic whatever he or she is saying isn't memorable, isn't actionable. i think that story has worn thin. david: finally the idea obama is sort of real historic game-changer, he can walk on water. he got the nobel peace prize before he did anything for example, has that story worn thin? >> well it did until the bin laden situation happened. because that was really, you know, magi
. among those photographed are george w. bush abdul michael dukakis and richard depp -- gephardt. and encore presentation of books now.a c-span: arthur grace you have a new book out called "choose me" portraits of a presidential198 race."7ou where did you get this idea? >> guest: well basically it was an idea that newsweek came up with in early 1987 around last january, early february. they wanted to do something different with the presidential candidates. portraits but not... they weren't sure what they wanted to do but just a different idea.y r so newsweek picture editor karen mclarkey approached me and saido do you have any ideas on this. what would you like to do? and i thought about it and i came up with this concept ofd i doing in black and white in a two and a quarter format without strobe lights, using only available or natural light. and we tried it out first witht gary hart. we went out to -- i believe it s was cleveland early on in february of 1987 and i had the first assignment out there.wa i came back and showed them the photographs and they were veryhe pleased with
to george w. bush, but in 2004 went to john kerry. the president had a nine-point victory in 2008. we really are a tossup state. the polls go back and forth. it is difficult to determine who is going to win this state right now. host: is their early voting? how do new hampshire residents vote on election day? guest: there are absentee ballots. you have to sign a form that says you not be available on voting day to come to the polls. traditionally, they are open from 7:00 until 7:00. some are open until 8:00 p.m. on election day. we have one of the highest voter turnout in the country. other statistical interesting statistics -- statistical facts are that we are one of the least taxed state in the nation. the least taxed state. we have no income tax, no sales tax. both the democrat and republican candidates will campaign on that issue, pledging that they will not have an income tax or sales tax. are gubernatorial candidates right now are both running on that issue, as a matter of fact. host: talk about the recount laws in the state of new hampshire. what are the rules for that? guest: we have
the same amount of people looking for work as when george bush was president. left presidency, we would have a 10.6 unemployment rate. it's far worse than it looks. >> gretchen: what about this u 6 unemployment rate being 14.6% for october. what's u 6? >> that is everyone who is looking for work part timers, all the people in the workforce rather than just eliminating a lot of people who simply stopped looking. the u-6 some people think it's the real unemployment rate. i mean, i don't think there is any perfect number to read this and we have always used u-3. u-6 i think tells you a little more these days about what's going on in the economy. >> gretchen: if you don't have a job it's 100% unemployment rate so it's all relative. >> that's right. >> gretchen: adjusted unemployment rate unemployment rate of labor force equal to january of 2009 when president obama came. in would actually be 10. a%, correct? >> i think 10.5, 10.6, yeah. very high. you have a bunch of people coming that the market every month that have to be met. i think it's 120,000. certainly it's just stagnation. last yea
it is -- it was very clear with george bush, he undervalued fema, to put it under homeland security, put brownie, great job brownie who was a horse guy, political appointee in this, this has been professionalized, pulled up, fema runs well because you have a president that believes in it. >> okay. >> jim? >> are you telling me that barack obama made -- before barack obama, fema sucked is that what you're telling me? >> i'm telling you. >> no, that's what you're saying. >> they cut the budget for it and president bush undervalued this operation and showed mitt romney -- i'm talking about mitt romney now saying he would not get rid -- >> have you watched the clips? >> you were there, you were up in new hampshire when it was happening. >> i was watching it. >> i watched the clip, peter, he didn't say that. >> he didn't say what i just read? >> the whole discussion was about downsizing government. he never said we should cut fema. he should we should take funds and -- >> you want to ask chris christie about that? >> sure. give him a call. >> look. >> come on, peter. >> my point on this, jim -- >> what is
was for the auto rescue. no, they weren't. most republicans, with the exception by the way of president george w. bush who let it happen with actions he took, were against the auto rescue. so i don't understand, well i do understand, but people just don't want to take responsibility for where they stood on that issue. >> this was a question, carly about the auto bailout b. what role government direct government money would play in restructuring these companies. >> that's right. and who stands first in line to be repaid? is it the unions? or is it debtors and creditors? that was the fundamental question. and the truth is, it is disingenuous and factually inaccurate to say that republicans weren't for the rescue of the auto industry. the question was how. and what. and who would be repaid. but let me go back to your original question. of course it's about the economy. and in ohio, both governor kasich and mitt romney are right. governor kasich is right that his policies fundamentally different than obama's, lower taxes, close the budget deficit. make, create a regulatory environment that encourage
the republican party has blocked it over and over again. george bush put forward a bill that the republican party would not even consider. we of 11 million people live -- living in the shadows were working hard. we need to provide them a path to citizenship without putting a disadvantage to people of waited in line. for young people who were brought here as little children, we need to make sure their dreams and aspirations of a realistic chance of being rely so they can contribute in the communities again. >> one minute left. just a 42nd recap you like to leave the voters with. >> i been ranked as one of the most independent congressman in the united states. take a look at the chicago tribune. they have said dole is the clear choice. frankly i am able to bridge the political divide and reach across the aisle. i have done that for the past 22 months. it being on front on israel issues, being a leader. i am a social moderate. certainly my record stand up for that. -- stands up for that. we've seen this past two years of congress that has put fighting ahead of comprehensive collaboration. we need so
on the presidential election. caller: george w. bush -- i worked with him from 2000 to to 2005. i changed to be an independent. and then i changed. but now obama -- he has too many good things going for him. he made some serious mistakes. but he has too many good things going for him. i will vote for him. if i can vote. our elections in this building, there's no electricity. if i can, i will vote for obama. host: james from new jersey. i want to bring in another new jersey congressman, congressman,. . our last caller brought up a concern about voting on tuesday. well but be a problem? guest: it may be a problem in the sense of people being able to access a polling place. now, every authority whether it is the governor or the county clerk's -- they assured us that there will be places to vote. but if we have places to vote that are significantly distant from where people traditionally do vote, or where there is an access problem -- that does pose a problem. we have to make sure that there is a polling place that is operational, and in a reasonable location for people to vote. you cannot te
campaign that he claims continues to blame president george w. bush for any of america's challenges at this time. right now the campaign remains confident. they think this think will be down to the wire. they say it shows a different story than some of the public polls, and they feel very strongly they're going to win this on tuesday. that's the latest. back to you. >> all right, i'll take it. coming up in just a few minutes, hard ball's chris matthews. we're going to ask him if something unexpected is going on in pennsylvania. and could that change the race? well he should know because he is from the keystone state. that is just ahead for you. >>> let's get the latest on the devastation left by hurricane sandy. this morning federal and local officials will update the president on the government's storm response. right now, the power is back on in thousands of more homes. but more than 2.9 million customers are still without power across six states, most of them in new jersey. repair crews are coming to the region from across the country. the death toll from sandy is rising, sadly.
is the recovery is much, much weaker than any recovery we've ever seen. only the george w. bush recovery is on par with this in terms of recovery from a recession for job creation. so what we have here is a situation that is improved from the conditions to the end of the recession. it's unquestionably improved. but not improved by enough to be anywhere near where it needs to be for the vast majority of americans who have seen their income stag nate or for the 12 million people who are still looking for work and can't find a job. >> craig, what about the stock market getting a boost because of yesterday's consumer confidence report which gives the highest rating since 2008? so that and you take in the new jobs report, what does it mean for the overall economy? >> and potentially how people feel about it and this presidential election? >> i think one of the positive things about today's unemployment report is that it corroborate rates some of the other positive news trickling in from places like the stock market, the number of people claiming insurance has been edging down steadily. as you were sayi
. >> good morning, steve. >> steve: let's go back to george herbert walker bush, president 41, he lost because? >> he got hit with a poor economy and it's unfortunate, if you look in the fourth quarter of 1992, actually we grew at 4%. if that election had been a few weeks later, he probably would have won. he was at 90% in the polls 18 months before that and then the recession hit, but we started coming out of it, he just was the product of bad fortune, i think, more than anything and clinton was a good candidate. >> steve: nick, i think you're avoiding the elephant in the room. what about ross perot, a texas businessman who came from nowhere, shot up in the polls and wind up with 19% of the-- >> 19%. >> steve: and eventually from george bush. >> exactly the largest third party candidacy in the 20th century. had perot probably not been in the race, i think that bush would have been reelected and that's kind after historical abberation with bush losing. >> steve: let's talk about jimmy carter, lousy economy and plus the iranian hostages. >> he ran into a bad economy and a bad candidate
at the inaugural gala in 1985, and met a whole bunch of presidents- - richard nixon, george h.w. bush, bill clinton. he wrote an impressive, picture- laden book, "the president's table." and was invited to the finest anchor desks in town. >> barry h. landau is presidential historian... >> the story of the ultimate inauguration collector... >> simon: but when we met up with him in june, he no longer wanted to tell his story. he'd been convicted of the single largest theft of historic artifacts in the united states. he stole thousands of items, including hundreds of documents, signed by some of the most famous names in history-- george washington, thomas jefferson, francis scott key, marie antoinette, and voltaire. he'd pilfered them from museums and libraries all over the country. u.s. attorney rod rosenstein was in charge of the prosecution. he was a con man? >> rod rosenstein: barry landau was a con artist. and he used his reputation as a presidential historian in order to gain the confidence of museums and other people who had custody of important documents. and then he stole them. it was a reput
in the tidewater region. you can see it is compared with 2004 when george w. bush won the state. you can see that president bush won more of the tidewater region than did john mccain in 2008. if you were president obama and you were mitt romney, where would you focus your resources, larry? guest: you can tell by where they are visiting. romney spends a lot of time in the richmond area. he needs a big vote out of those localities, some of which voted for president obama. other various conservative localities like chesterfield county went as high as 45% for president obama in 2008. there's no way for republicans to win statewide and allow centreville to get 45% of the votes to obama. they're both campaigning in northern virginia. it is the linchpin of a statewide victory for president obama. he needs to do well in the big, growing burgeoning prince george county and loudoun county, as well as fairfax. yes, the two areas are small, but trees and rocks and acres don't vote, at least in most states and localities. host: what kind of the voting system is used in virginia? guest: the computerized s
can see when george into the bush when the state in 2004 -- won the state in 2004. if you're president obama and your mitt romney, where would you focus your resources? guest: you can tell where they are visiting. mitt romney spent a lot of time in the richmond area. some of those areas voted for obama. there is no way for a republican tool win -- they are both campaigning in virginia. he needs to do well in those execs that i mentioned. -- excerpts that i mentioned. loudon county is less diverse, but still important. >> we take you to west chester, ohio where mitt romney and paul ryan are holding a rally tonight. speaking now is virginia governor bob mcdonnell. live coverage here on c-span. >> we will have a great celebration next tuesday. [cheers and applause] this is a very serious election as you know. this is about restoring the american dream. this is about getting the greatest country on earth out of debt and back to work. this is about leadership for the future, our kids, and grandkids. this is about the positive romney-ryan-ronald vision. it is a series election. there is only
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)